Internet and children. Online threats.

29 July 2014

childThe young audience of the Internet is currently estimated at millions children under 14. More than 85% of teenagers over 12 years old use the Internet, and the number is growing. Today, children first go online at the age of 4.

  • According to numerous researches and surveys, over a half (52%) of Internet users under 14 have visited sites that are not intended for children.
  • More than 45% of children have seen (both intentionally and inadvertently) porn online.
  • Slightly fewer children (40%) have encountered pedophilic activities on the web.
  • Around 15% of the questioned children reported that strangers tried to arrange a personal meeting with them.
  • One-third of them agreed to meet or somehow disclosed their personal details.

Besides, the list of things that children regularly face online includes violence, gambling, drugs and alcohol, extremist materials, sects and nationalistic propaganda. Many suffer from online fraud and computer viruses.
Many parents are aware of the potential online threats and do their best to protect their children.

In 63% of cases, this is limited to child control and monitoring; 25% use special software like filters and security add-ons; 12% use built-in parental control tools integrated into the operating system.

Updating Refog programs to version 8

7 February 2014

We are glad to announce that we have finished working on version 8 of Refog Personal Monitor and Refog Employee Monitor.

Personal Monitor Personal Monitor

The new versions of the programs can be downloaded from corresponding pages.

The following new features were added:

  • Periodical capturing of images from an integrated or external webcam connected to the computer.
  • Recording of all Skype calls.
  • Full support of Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.
  • In Employee Monitor, we added a possibility to install agents on the network using MSI packages.

Below is detailed information on new features, configuration and licensing.  More »

RoboRoach: Controllable cockroaches

8 November 2013

tarakan-300x225In exactly two months a special device called RoboRoach will be on sale in the U.S. that allows people to control cockroaches from their smartphones. The set will cost about $90.

The Blaberus giant cockroach is not included, but is easily found in pet stores and from breeders: this variety is a popular food for exotic animals.

A tiny microcontroller is attached to the back of a live cockroach so that it touches its antennae. The smartphone is connected via BlueTooth. An app that directs the microcontroller lets you set the amplitude and type of impulses sent to the cockroach’s antennae.

RoboRoach, by Backyard Brains, is an educational project for studying the fundamentals of neurobiological experiments.

Earlier this summer a similar project was conducted at the University of North Carolina, although this didn’t focus on education, but rather more practical applications — search operations, for example.

NSA: collection of mobile users’ location data

8 November 2013

kitKeith Alexander, head of United States National Security Agency, confirmed that in 2010, NSA used experimental equipment to collect information about the location of mobile subscribers.

In 2011, the process was officially suspended, but the agency’s head does not deny the possibility of resuming it in the future: “It may be something that this country might need in the future.“

On the eve of this announcement, senator Ron Wyden inquired about such practices, but Keith replied that their agency has never collected such information and had no plans to do that.

The news caused outrage with the senator — he said that the government kept concealing facts about monitoring all aspects of the citizens’ rights.

Global gas station fraud stopped in Russia

8 October 2013

azsIt would sound like pure madness just a few years ago, but appears to be a reality nowadays. A group of Russian criminals successfully hacked a network of fully automated gas stations with a purpose of unlawful enrichment.

Special modules were found at dozens of gas stations owned by major oil companies that stole a few liters of gas from each client and sent them to a separate tank. This high-tech “bugs” were controlled remotely via devices disguised as regular calculators.

Gas station owners were not involved in this fraud and the police suspect former employees who had access to and knowledge of all hardware and software systems of these stations.

The revenue generated from this scheme is estimated in millions of rubles and was shared between all members of the group. The police believe that similar devices may still be installed at gas stations across the country and is currently conducting a thorough inspection with the help of security services of the oil companies.

Users are leaving Facebook

8 October 2013

Facebook: possible information leakAccording to Daily Mail, there is an interesting tendency in England and USA: users no longer use social networks. Recently, over 11,000,000 users have deleted their Facebook accounts.

Daily Mail is a popular daily newspaper that has been in circulation in the United Kingdom since 1896. It is the second largest newspaper in the country.

The main reasons for leaving social networks are the urge to protect privacy and fear of Internet dependency.

Analysts associate this tendency with Wikileaks and Snowden, who revealed that USA National Security Service tracks network users.

The ex-users of Facebook usually explain their motives by saying that they have lost interst.

The US National Security Agency purchases exploits

8 October 2013

nsa-hackerWe recently learned about an annual contract between the US NSA and the French company VUPEN, according to which the French supplied the NSA with access to their database of vulnerabilities and exploits for targeted attacks against systems and sites.

Thanks to the Freedom of Information Act in the US, it was learned that this contract was signed as early as September 2012.

It also came to light that VUPEN cooperates with other NATO representatives, as well. According to an employee of the company, they actually do sell access to their data to the military and intelligence agencies.

Among hackers, however, this revelation caused mixed reaction since VUPEN’s database is not known for being either cheap or up-to-date, i.e. it is possible to obtain more complete and up-to-date information for less money. It was assumed that it is not the main channel for obtaining exploits, just one of them.

Android: Google knows your Wi-Fi passwords

8 October 2013

smartphone wifi accessMichael Horowitz, an IT security expert, has published an article titled “Google Knows Nearly Every Wi-Fi Password in the World”. The article explains that Google servers currently store unencrypted passwords from nearly all access point that Android devices have ever connected to.

According to research, there are over 1 billion Android devices in the world. Each of these devices stores Wi-Fi access point passwords in a way that allows Google (and, therefore, secret services, for instance) access them.

Moreover, default Android settings allow these passwords to be stored and sent to Google’s servers in an unencrypted plain text form (for backup purposes).

Gaining access to a Wi-Fi network is the least one can do with this information at hand.

Men read others’ correspondence twice as often

13 September 2013

man-with-phoneThe results of a survey conducted among two thousand British citizens showed that men studied the contents of their girlfriends’ phones twice as often as women.

62% of male respondents admitted doing so as opposed to only 34% of women.

What were these men interested in their partners’ phones? It’s very simple – around a half of respondents were looking for SMS messages, while the other half were looking for social network posts.

In the majority of cases (89%), the purpose of these inspections was to find out if their partners had an affair.

The British believe that the lack of trust in couples can be a serious problem of the society as a whole on a global level.

Samsung SmartTV Hacked

13 September 2013

samsung-smarttvMartin Herfurt, a German information security expert, announced a successful attempt to hack a Samsung TV with SmartTV functionality.

The attack was made from a remote computer and aimed at disrupting the broadcast over HbbTV.

The hack became possible thanks to the use of WebKit 1.1 in the TV’s web browser. WebKit 1.1 is known for multiple unfixed vulnerabilities and lack of SSL support.

The expert managed to replace the broadcast with his own footage, enable subtitles and even install a Bitcoin generation on the TV set.